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Old 03-26-2021, 03:48 PM   #10
Hoseman1958
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Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Seymour, TN
Age: 62
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Vehicle: 1993 Nissan D21 4x4 2.4L
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alabama_lowlife View Post
Iím not sure how a gas leak could be associated with a head gasket problem. Unless the problem isnít a gas leak, but some sort of issue with excess fuel being supplied by the ECM due to erroneous readings from the oxygen sensor because of contamination from the blown head gasket. But I would wait until the head gasket is either fixed or ruled out before addressing that issue. Unless of course there is an actual fuel leak which should be fixed ASAP for safety purposes.

With higher mileage youíre likely to see lower compression numbers. This alone would not necessarily be cause for concern as long as they are consistent across the board. So if you see 130 psi on all cylinders I wouldnít worry about it. Yes, this will adversely affect performance but unless youíre wanting to rebuild the engine to regain slight power loss due to age, itís not an immediate cause for concern.

What would indicate a blown head gasket is a substantially low reading from one or more cylinders, especially if those cylinders are adjacent. I think the most common failure I see reported online is the gasket blown between cylinders #2&3.

The area where the timing chain cuts the timing cover is on the driver side of the engine. There is usually not a easily visible open hole. There is usually a worn rectangular area, then one edge will finally get just a slim sliver of an opening that allows the coolant to escape. Itís pressurized so it only takes a little thin slice. The hole may not be visible but the worn area should be.

A - I have the valve cover off and can see that the chain guide on the driver's side is completely gone with a thin, but pronounced worn edge into the metal of the timing chain cover by the chain. I will replace the cover when I put the new chain and guides it.....but is there any way to know whether or not the head gasket is also blown without either removing the head....or putting everything back together and doing a compression test?
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